Category Archives: Zen Hunting

Spot-and-Stalk Black Bear Hunting Top 10 Tips

Spring black bear season is fast approaching, so today I’d like to offer my top 10 tips for bagging a black bear spot-and-stalk style.

Full Disclosure: I am NOT a professional black bear hunter. I bow hunted bears in Idaho on two separate occasions (2012 and 2016), and last year was my first successful hunt. That being said, I spoke to two different biologists in advance of each hunt and studied everything I could find on black bear hunting, habitat, and behavior. Still, it took many days to finally get the job done.

Interestingly, much of the theoretic data I collected in the preseason proved wrong. For instance, one article stated that early morning is the least productive time to spot bears. But in my experience I saw just as many bears early as late in the day. One biologist mentioned that bears absolutely hate the rain, but I ended up shooting my bear in a steady rain storm. Go figure.

Ultimately, spot-and-stalk success comes from boots on the ground and relentless time in the field; in other words, real-life experience.

Now let’s get on with my Top Ten Tips:

1. Food is Everything: Someone once said that black bears are just big hairy pigs. They eat, dig, and root around constantly, rarely holding still for very long. Since they’re so distracted, it should make them easy to hunt, right? Kinda. Like deer, bears feed for a while, then bed down for a few hours and repeat. The good news is that bears are easy to spot and generally found out in the open.

Bear feeding on south-facing open slope near old-growth forest.

Spring bears primarily feed on new grass shoots, wild onions, clover, dandelions, and other spring offerings. It is imperative to talk to your regional biologist to find out what the bears are primarily feeding on in your area.

Bears in western Idaho feed heavily on yellow flowers called “arrow-leaved balsamroot”.

As for time of day, my advice is to hunt bears like deer: Get to a high lookout before first light and start glassing steep, grassy, south-facing slopes adjacent to old-growth forest (used for bedding). Of the nine bears I encountered last year, most were spotted in the early morning or late afternoon.

Even in the best units, you’ll likely glass many miles before actually laying eyes on a bear. If you can’t glass up a bear, keep moving. Get away from the roads, explore remote canyons, and cover as much ground as possible. Bears are solitary animals and are spread out across their range. This leads to tip #2.

2. Look for Sign: If glassing fails, the next step is to locate an area that looks “beary” and look for sign. You’re looking for large piles of black or green dropping, claw marks on trees, tree trunks rubbed smooth with hair attached, diggings, tracks in mud, turned over items, and dug-in tracks (see photo below). I’ll break these things down separately as we go, but basically you’re just looking for concentrations of bear sign and focusing your efforts there.

The most common sign you’ll encounter is droppings, aka scat. Droppings come out wet and green, then quickly oxidize to black (within 24-hours in warm weather). If you’re not finding droppings, keep moving.

Fresh green bear droppings.

3. Examine the Trees: An area dense with claw-marked trees is a good indication of a likely bear hang-out. Black bears–especially cubs–like to climb trees which leaves claw marks in the bark.

Claw marks.

Bears also rub on trees just like deer, and they always have their favorite rub tree. Rub trees occur near trails or beds and are generally conifers with easily identifiable smooth spots with hair stuck to it.

Rub tree located on a saddle crossing.

4. Watch for Tracks: Unlike deer, bear leave few tracks because their foot pads are wide and soft which spreads their weight out. Most bear tracks are found in snow, mud, or soft dirt.

Rear foot track in mud.

Another strange phenomon I found was “dug-in” tracks. Dug-in tracks are frequently found near bedding areas. Rather than soft tracks, these are trails that bears uses every single day while traveling from feed to bed. Because they step in the exact same spots each day, it creates staggered depressions in the ground. (see photo below)

Dug-in tracks.

Bear tracks will help you judge the size of a bear. Basically the main pad (front or back) of a mature bear (sow or boar) will be 4.5 inches or wider. Sow tracks generally don’t get bigger than 4.5″, but a big boar will stretch up to five or six inches.

Five-inch wide front track made by a boar.

5. Find Bedding Areas: Bear beds are similar to deer beds and are usually located in thick stands of trees not far from feeding areas. Bear beds often look like large nests, whereas the bear pushes branches and ground cover out to the edges of the bed. Bears also like to bed on the cool, dark north-face near the tops of ridges. Also, just about every bed I found had multiple piles of scat nearby.

6. Watch for Items Turned Over: What the heck does this mean? Rocks, logs, and cow pies turned upside-down. This is something I never read about before, but everywhere I found bears or bear sign I found multiple items turned upside down. A rock lying next to a depression in the ground where it previously lied is most common. In springtime bears are primarily herbivores, but they really love protein from insects, grubs, mice, and other animals hiding underground. You’ll also encounter occasional diggings. Diggings consist of a random two or three-foot holes dug into the dirt where the bear went after a squirrel or other animal.

7. The Triple “S” of Bear Behavior: Secretive, Shy, and Slippery: Assuming you’ve found a good feeding area with lots of bear sign, there’s still no guarantee you’ll find a bear. On several of my hunts I found areas littered with bear sign, but no bears anywhere. Slippery: Bears have a bad habit of disappearing right in front of you. They mosey behind a tree and they’re suddenly gone from the world. They are such quiet animals and chronically secretive. They are very shy and simply don’t want to be found.

Being patient is the key to bear success. When a bear finds a good feeding area/hillside, he’ll likely stay on it for several days. If you’re in a good location, or if you glassed up the bear earlier in the day, he’ll likely re-appear sooner or later in the same general area.

8. Watch the Nose: Bear hunting is technically easier than deer hunting because unlike deer, bears have relatively poor hearing and eyesight. However, the bear’s nose is equal to or better than a deer’s nose. Simply put, if he smells you it’s game over, so hunting according to wind direction is critical.

Note: Bears have a short attention span. If a bear sees or hears you, hold very still and he’ll likely forget you were there.

9. Watch the Weather: Just like deer, bears avoid heavy rain or snow. However, a light or sporadic rain doesn’t seem to bother them; if they’re hungry they’ll brave the elements. In my experience rain was a non-factor, but snow and freezing weather was real bad news.

On two occasions I spotted a bear one day, and when the snow moved in the next day they completely disappeared. This is especially a problem in the early season (April and May) when the bears are living close to their dens. When the snow flies, they head back to their dens and won’t emerge again until the weather is better. It’s much easier to just go to bed and wait for brighter days.

10. Know the Anatomy: Unlike hooved animals, bears carry their vitals (heart/lungs) further forward in their chest. On a broadside bear, the front shoulder blocks your shot unless the front leg is moving forward. I learned this the hard way by trying to squeeze the arrow too tight to the shoulder. My arrow ended up hitting it’s big, powerful shoulder, which stopped my arrow short of the vitals. Fortunately he swung around to face me and my second arrow sailed under it’s chin and into the chest. The big boar didn’t go too far, but I was lucky. Fortunately bears don’t react the same way as deer; they’re more likely to stay put after a poor shot instead of instinctively sprinting away.

I hope you found these tips helpful for your spot-and-stalk bear hunt. I realize the majority of bear hunters prefer using dogs or bait to get their bear. But in my experience, there’s nothing more exciting or challenging or rewarding than getting it done on the ground the old-fashioned way.

My 2016 spot-and-stalk black bear.

Good luck, and be careful out there!

Survival Hunting Techniques

The following is a guest blog by Daniel Chabert

SURVIVAL HUNTING TECHNIQUES

Survival hunting techniques are techniques needed to get your game in the wild during an emergency, disaster or critical condition when you are not equipped with ready-made gears such as gun, arrow, and nets. Many circumstances could warrant one being separated from civilization and assistance irrespective of how cautious you are, but sometimes it could come naturally.

If you will like to endure the harsh conditions of survival circumstance, proteins and animal fats must be eaten frequently. This makes survival hunting an important skill. A survival situation is an energy sapping experience due to potentially harsh weather which makes use of increased calories to produce enough heat to stay warm and perform the physical tasks needed to survive.

Energy from the wild animals obtained through hunting is essential to augment the increased metabolized calories in the body for survival. Such conditions are a drain on a person’s energy. Potentially inclement weather forces your body to metabolize calories at an increased rate to stay warm, and performing the physical tasks required to take care of your body consumes lots of energy. The concentrated calories from wild edible animals obtained through survival hunting are an efficient way to keep the internal fire burning.

ANIMALS TO TARGET

In surviving in the wild, it is better to go for small game such as the rodents, reptiles, birds, fish, amphibians rather than the large game such as the ungulates. Small animals occur more in the wild and are easily accessible compared to their larger counterparts on a given part of the land. In general, small game animals are active when they are in need of food and are searching for food, mostly in the morning and evening. They are predictable in their movement as they usually follow maze or a pathway leading to their food source. They are very cautious about being seen by predators, as such they move in an area of dense vegetation and cover.

Nate Allred with a freshly-killed wilderness rabbit, and cooking it on a rock.

Invertebrates such as crickets, locusts, bugs and other insects can also be a good survival meal. Mollusks (clams and snails) can also be considered. Invertebrates are nutritious and easy to catch—you can pick them from their hole, on leaves and stems, or wherever you find them. Boil or smoke them very well to kill all pathogens and parasites on and in the invertebrates. Snails are usually found in a cool place: under leaves, logs and debris. They are mostly nocturnal and come out during the day when the weather is conducive for them. One must be wary of snakes when rummage around for snails in a cool place or under logs because the also hide in cool secluded place during rest.

FISHING TECHNIQUES

Fishing is another good way of surviving in the wilderness, fish taste good, have a wealth of vitamins and nutrients. Having many ways of to catch fish will definitely go a long way in the survival race. Fish can provide a balanced meal each day but it is really a hard task in getting your fish out of the water. Some fish—like bass and tilapia—are bottom feeders and are usually found in cover. They usually feed throughout the day and can be fished with simple techniques.

Insects, earthworms and fish remnants can be used as bait. Surface temperatures rising as the result of the warm front is a good time to fish as they increase their food consumption. This is especially true during winter when fish suddenly become more active as a result of increasing temperature.

It is also a good time to fish during slight rain. Fish enjoy the rain as they come out to feed and play, and the raindrops are also useful to obscure the predator from being sighted by the fish. In the case of absence of important fishing gears such as hook and lines, gill nets, lift nets, etc. and improvised arrow-head throwing stick could be used in killing the unlucky fish.

Camouflaging and stealth walking is also useful in fishing; fish can both hear the sound and see above water. Shiny cloth and objects can chase away certain species of fish while it also attracts others. Put on a disguise and do away with noise as much as you can though some fish are inquisitive about noise and you may draw in fish such as bass with noise. A long stick could also be sharpened into spear using a small fire or rubbed against stones.

HUNTING TECHNIQUES

Throwing Sticks

The most important and widely used tool in surviving hunting is throwing sticks. Throwing sticks may be categorized into two types: short and long. The short ones are thicker and heavier; they are mostly useful throwing at animals such as the reptiles, birds and other small game animals while the long ones are lighter and longer; about 1 meter or more in length. The long ones are sharpened by rubbing against stones or sharp objects such as the knife. The long throwing sticks could also be made out of a branching stem to form a knob at one end for clubbing your prey.

Throwing sticks could either be overhand or sidearm. In overarm, the stick is thrown to animals such as birds, squirrel and reptile up on the tree. One should position himself in such a way that there would be a clear view of the target and stay unnoticed by the animal. Place your left leg in front in case of a right right-hander, and another way round in case of left-hander to give stability and enough vigor to throw.

Aim the target and throw at ones. Your arm will move from the back through the shoulder to the target on the tree. Sidearm throw also follows the same technique with over-arm except that it is thrown through the side front ways. This method is specifically used for an animal in open field such as grazing or basking animals. Throwing sticks are very effective but needed precision by practicing during leisure time.

Stones/ Rocks

Stone/rocks are another material useful in surviving in the jungle. The major challenge is hitting your target with one. This calls for little practice through aiming a target during leisure time. Stones are mostly useful in killing birds and other arboreal animals. Throwing stone techniques is a similar to throwing sticks: move close to your target as you can without being noticed, put your right leg in front is you a left-hander and vice verse. Your hand movement will be from back to front through the shoulder.

Snares

Snares are also an effective instrument in getting game animals. The snare is made from interwoven steel cable, string and sinew. The string is made into a loop with a shutter system. They are also set at animal trails and walkways; placed out of sight for the animals. The size of the loop and strength of the string depends on the size and strength of the animal being hunted. If the snare is set for big animal and minute animal passes, it may go scot free but if a small loop is made for a larger animal, they might destroy and cart away with your snare.

Unknowingly, the animals put its head through the loop in the course of walking, this trigger the shutter system, the sapling (part of the shutter system) stretch upright and pulls the string to tighten the loop, causes strangulation or sometimes breaking the animal’s neck. Snares can also be set in water.

Knives

Knives are one of the most important tools for survival and come in various forms and sizes. Knives are useful in cutting, slicing, killing, climbing, defense and putting other tools in place. They could also be thrown at targets but that requires special techniques. It is also risky as your targets could run away with your precious knife.

The most significant thing to do during surviving hunting situation is to be patient and always take cognizance of your environment at heart. You need to preserve your energy, mind your safety and be vigilant of your environment. Replenishing your lost nutrient is paramount to survival. It is important to understand where to find food important to maintain a normal body temperature, good mental and emotional state and give enough drive and energy to lead to survival.

Knowledge of the nature, habitat and movement of animals are paramount in hunting techniques. Survival hunting materials that can be easily improvised for are many depending on the materials available. Throwing sticks, snares, snare, traps, stones, knife are useful in getting meals to carry-on. Little techniques are required to use the material.

Patience, stealth walking and precision are the major techniques to survive as the land-animals are difficult food sources to get a hold of in surviving period, primarily because they are the most difficult to catch- fast and observant. The food source you take advantage of depends on the habitat you are in.

Final Note: All wild animals should be cooked thoroughly to kill potential germs in and on the meat and carcass.

Writer’s Bio

Skateboarder, maker, guitarist, reclaimed wood collector and AIGA member. Working at the fulcrum of simplicity and function to create great work for living breathing human beings. I sometimes make random things with friends.

Hunt Like a Cougar

Who is the greatest mule deer hunter in the world? That’s right, it’s Mr. Cougar (aka mountain lion). Out West an adult cougar kills a mule deer every 10-14 days. That’s 30 deer per year!

Why do we care? Because the average western hunter is lucky to kill just one mule deer in a year. At that rate how can anyone expect to improve their skills, especially when hunting with primitive weapons? Perhaps we can learn a few things from our feline friends…

Cougars are actually similar to humans in many ways. For instance, we’re both predators and meat-eaters with forward-placed eyes designed to catch fast motion. We’re similar in size and even color: a cougar is tan/orange just like a human before he dons some fancy camo pattern. And just like cougars, we love to hunt mule deer!

A few years ago I started comparing my own hunting style with that of a cougar. I found this to be a surprisingly helpful way to hone my hunting skills and make decisions afield.

Below I’ve listed several traits that make a cougar such an efficient mule deer hunter, and how we can learn from them:

• Cougars stalk very close: Killing is done eye to eye, paw to hoof. Survival means stalking very close and remaining completely undetected. Deer can’t see super-slow motion or fine detail, so the cougar capitalizes on those weaknesses. Stalks can last several hours, and even then, most stalks end in failure. But the cougar persists and eventually eats. The two greatest virtues a hunter can glean from cougars are patience and persistence.

• Cougars are light on their feet: Have you ever seen an obese cougar? Heck no. Mature males typically weigh 125 to 220 pounds, and they only eat as much food as is necessary to survive. Cougars also eat 100% organic, lean meat and avoid processed food and carbs. Instinctually, cougars know that over-eating will slow them down and make them inefficient killers. What can we learn? It’s pretty obvious: stay trim.

• Cougars hunt alone: Cougars rarely hang out in packs, and when they do it’s usually a young family or juvenile group. Adult cougars live and hunt on their own. There’s no reason in the world they would hunt in a group. Hunting in a group increases visibility, doubles their scent, and slows them down. A cougar doesn’t get home sick or lonely either, which makes him mentally tough and distraction-free. For all these reasons, bowhunters can benefit greatly by hunting alone too.

• Cougars cover lots of ground: A cougar’s home range is anywhere from 10 to 300 square miles, and he often travels hundreds of miles in search of game. He’s constantly mobile. If a cougar keeps hunting the same mountainside every day, he’ll eventually run out of food and starve. Human hunters might consider doing the same. If you aren’t finding deer where you have in the past, it might be time to move on. Being flexible enough to explore new areas (or new units) could be the ticket to success this season. More importantly is being physically able to cover lots of rugged country once you’re out there.

• Cougars don’t carry extra weight: Killing is done using powerful fangs and claws, not heavy, cumbersome weapons and a pack-load of gear. The cougar travels light, carrying only the basic necessities to live full-time in the wild. Sure, humans have different physical needs, but how different are we, really? We have a coat, the cougar has fur; we have a tent, he has a den; we have shoes, he has footpads, etc. Is a GPS, binos, cell phone, or camera really necessary to kill one mule deer? As for weapons, there are a myriad of lightweight options available. Many bow manufacturers make compound bows weighing less than three pounds, and traditional bows weighing less than one pound!

• Cougars minimize scent: There’s no question that cats are clean animals, and the cougar is no exception. Unlike pack hunters (wolves and coyotes) the cougar hunts alone. Thus, he incorporates daily tongue baths and carefully buries his stinky treasures, all for the sake of reducing his presence afield. For us humans, vigilant scent reduction increases your overall success by reducing your footprint in the woods. Of course 100% scent elimination is impossible, but there are a number of ways to reduce scent without going overboard. I am a big proponent of field baths as well as scent-eliminating sprays, deodorants, and detergents.

Conclusion:

Down through the ages cougars have used their innate and learned hunting skills to locate and kill more mule deer than any other animal on earth. This perfectly adapted predator doesn’t require fancy gadgetry, technology, apps, or upgrades to be successful. The next time you’re thinking about making changes to your hunting routine, ask yourself, “What would Mr. Cougar do?”

Final Note: If you ever get a chance, buy a tag and shoot a cougar. They are tasty, but more importantly we really don’t need the competition.

Happy Hunting!

Three Pillars of Bow Hunting Success

While bow hunting last year, it occurred to me that success can be divided into three equally important pillars. To put it in perspective, I created the diagram below:

Think back to your last hunt. Were you successful? If not, which pillar did you fall short on? Since each step is equally important, it should be easy to pinpoint where you need improvement.

Let’s break it down:

The first step, locating a buck, is something you can start doing right now. The best way to locate more bucks is to study their behavior, habitat, and ecology. You can also research harvest data and biologist’s reports on the unit you are planning to hunt. Then later, the scouting begins.

The second step, stalking a buck, is not always intuitive. Getting close to big bucks is the hardest step to master because, unlike shooting, it’s something we rarely get to practice. What it really boils down to patience: knowing when and how fast to move depending on conditions such as wind and cover.

Finally, shot execution. Almost everyone I talk to is pro-class shooter…until their arrow flies wide of an unsuspecting buck. Bowhunters are lucky just to get one or two shot opportunities in a season, so it’s very important to prepare for real-life hunting scenarios in advance. The best way to do this is to practice shooting in different positions, unknown yardages, around objects, and in adverse conditions such as wind.

I’ll certainly keep this “wheel of success” in mind when going into the next hunting season. I call it a ‘wheel’ because it just keeps on turning, year after year. After completing all three steps in a season, it begins again the following year. The goal is to keep the wheel from going in REVERSE, which only happens when you blow a stalk or botch a shot.

Good luck on a great buck this year!

New Deer’s Resolution 2017

WOW, a brand new year is upon us–already–and that means new goals, opportunities, and resolutions.

After months of pondering and soul searching, I finally settled on my number one new year’s resolution for 2017. Can you guess what it is?
That’s right: A 200+ inch monster muley with my bow. WHAT ELSE?!

I know, I know, it’s the same thing every year. But there’s nothing more challenging and rewarding than pursuing the ultimate prey with your bow (even if you come up a few inches short).

Keep in mind that accomplishing such a feat not only requires tons of work in the off-season, but a major change in lifestyle. Basically, every decision you make concerning life, work, and relationships MUST support the ultimate goal or you will fail! It’s not for everyone because if you can’t commit to the goal, then you can’t set the goal.

As a result, my three other resolutions are to:

a) Maintain my health and fitness necessary to conquer steep mountains.
b) Make enough money to live in the mountains all season long if necessary.
c) Study and meditate daily on the hunt…and that means tons of new BLOGS.

Last year I came out of the woods with a veritable wealth of new information and now I’m going to share it with you.

Part of my New Year’s resolution is to write at least one blog article every week. In doing this, I firmly believe it will help both of us advance closer to our lofty hunting goals together.

Stay tuned for exciting new information. It’s gonna be an amazing new year!

Letting the Buck Out of the Bag

My 2015 obsession.
My 2015 obsession.

Finally, a year later I’m letting the buck out of the bag. Actually I never bagged this buck to begin with, so unless someone else has, he’s STILL out of the bag.

Either way, this amazing 200″+, Northern Utah mule deer buck has haunted me every day since the 2015 season ended. I promised myself never to obsess over a buck (again), but not a single day went by for the entire year that I didn’t think about it.

The pictures in this article were taken from a video I shot at only 200 yards. At the time, he was surrounded by three other deer and there was no way to get closer. So I let him walk, thinking I might get a better opportunity the next day. But he had other plans.

A sentinel buck that ran with my buck.
A sentinel buck that accompanied my buck.

Like most big bucks, he immediately changed routine and kept me one step behind him until the season ended.

Hoping to get a second chance in 2016, I spent nearly 20 days of the season looking EVERYWHERE for him–high and low– but he was nowhere to be found. He is gone.

If you happen upon this tremendous buck, please give him my regards and tell him I miss him.

A look from behind.
A look from behind.

P.S. Despite the great heartbreak and strife of my 2016 bow hunt, I was still able to score on an impressive Idaho buck (story soon to come.) All is not lost…

Passing the Buck

mule-deer-3

The bowhunt is a only a few days away and the anticipation is making me crazy! How bout you?

The question that continually haunts me is how big-a-buck should I pass up? My goal is always a 200-inch buck, but what if a 195″ walks by? What about a great 170″ drop-tine?

Most bowhunters are just happy with any mature buck. Novice hunters might be happy with a spike or forked-horn. Others would be fine just putting meat in the freezer, horns be damned.

In order to make the decision to pass easier, I’ve compiled a short list of things to consider before you loose an arrow:

1. Are you more concerned with meat or horns? Maybe both? After all, meat comes with horns–it’s an added bonus. I don’t believe in killing deer simply for horns. To me, the meat is sacred. That being said, the bigger the buck, the more meat. A big, mature buck can weigh twice as much as a yearling, making trophy hunting a meat-wise prospect.

2. How many days are available for your hunt? If you’re seriously limited–like just the weekend–then any buck is a great buck! But if you really don’t need the meat, then holding out and eating the tag is quite okay. There will be more deer next year.

When I first started bowhunting, I only had four days to get it done. My system was easy: First day 4-point, second day 3 or 4 point, third day 3 point, fourth day anything!

3. Are you hunting a quality area? If so, you can expect multiple opportunities. So it just makes sense to hold out for a quality buck. If your area sucks, then any buck would be great.

4. If the buck in front of you is good, but not great, ask yourself, “Will I be happy with this buck once it’s down? Is this buck worth blowing my entire season on?”

These are important questions, especially for the seasoned hunter. You’re not getting any younger. If the buck doesn’t meet your goals, you may have serious regets for the next 12 months.

Many years ago, I would be tickled pink with any mature buck. For the longest time, I would pull an arrow at the slightest hint of a buck. Now, in order avoid year-long regret, I refuse to pull an arrow until I’ve summed up the buck and am absolutely sure it’s the one I’d be happy with. Once my arrow is nocked I’m in killing mode and it’s a lot harder to let the buck walk.

In the end, the decision to shoot is completely yours and should be based solely on your own personal goals. Pressure to succeed should come from one’s own desire to progress as a hunter, and not from your ego or desire to impress other people.

Good luck on a fine buck this year!

Bowhunting: A Healthy Obsession

bowhunter_1

The deer hunt is less than a week away, and not an hour passes without thinking about giant bucks.

Bowhunting is the only reason I get out of the bed in the morning. It’s all I care about; everything else in the world is secondary. I’m hopelessly obsessed!

Fortunately it’s a healthy obsession. You see, at this point in my life I’ve come to realize that although I’m good at several things, I’m really only GREAT at one thing: chasing down giant bucks with my bow. Don’t be mad; I didn’t choose it, it chose me.

Now that I’ve come to grips with this curse, I have only three goals in life. They are:

  1. Shoot a monster buck over 200″.

  2. Live a healthy and fit lifestyle so I can physically go about chasing 200″ bucks.

  3. Work my butt off during the off-season to afford as much time as necessary to shoot a 200″ buck.

Pretty simple, right!?

Whatever you’re doing in life, I urge you to find your healthy obsession. We’re not born with magical gifts, rather we must search our passions and fight relentlessly to achieve the seemingly impossible prize.

Do or die doing!

Whatever it Takes Bowhunting

rooftop_archery1

During last year’s bowhunt I missed a 50-yard shot at a pretty decent buck. Since then, I’ve pondered the miss hundreds of times in effort to pin-point exactly what went wrong.

There were many factors to consider: steepness of angle, a crappy rangefinder, holding the wrong pin, buck fever, etc.

By the time I patterned the buck, the season was over and the buck had disappeared. In order to avoid making the same mistake(s), I’ve addressed every possible variable:

1. I replaced my old rangefinder with one that calculates angles AND can actually see through brush to avoid false readings.

2. I switched to a single pin sight in order to eliminate wrong pin selection and pin-gapping issues under pressure.

3. I dialed up my bow poundage in order to get a flatter arrow trajectory.

4. I began shooting steeper angles.

My summer schedule is a consummate nightmare, so rarely can I go to the mountains and shoot angles. So I found the highest point in my yard (my rooftop) and began shooting from there.

There’s an old saying: “What a fool does in the end, the wise man does in the beginning.” At this point, I implore you to anticipate the worst possible shot scenario and practice for it. Do whatever it takes, because big bucks rarely give you a second chance.

Hunting Checklist

I just got back from an impromptu deer scouting trip, and right away I’m inspired to share my own personal “hunting checklist.” My wife and I were both in a hurry to get out-of-town, so naturally we forgot several items. But believe me, I won’t make this mistake during my actual hunt.

Since bowhunting deer is the most important thing I do, I am very thorough in my preparation and gear packing. I have been compiling this list for more than fifteen years and frequently add new items. Note: Some items don’t apply to short trips, or even every trip. Did I forget anything? Let me know.

Here it is:

hunt-list